Poor Almaty

IMG_0247First, Issue 9 of the Magazine is out! It has an amazing cover story on the role of WWII in shaping modern Asia and the lingering effects of its ghosts by Paul French. Bill Hayton, who talks us through the “other claimants” to the South China Sea, Vietnam and Philippines, primarily. Yo-Jung Chen explains that Prime Minister Abe’s regional diplomacy has been dominated by Japan’s past and China’s future. And Melissa Lefkowitz discusses Africans living in China. There is also a particularly great piece on the Iran deal from Ankit Panda (which I’ll have up as a brief excerpt tomorrow on the website), an article on forward deployment by Robert Farley (editing my former professors will never cease to amuse me) and a neat piece from Poppy McPherson on Myanmar’s favorite weatherman.

Bottom line: get a subscription and get reading! We’re creeping up on my one year with The Diplomat and subsequently the Magazine’s first birthday. Unbelievable.

And on to last week in Central Asia (and, of course, nearby realms):

Kazakhstan lost the 2022 Olympic Winter Games to Beijing (and we were wondering how they’d pay for them anyway) but did get voted, officially, into the WTO. The details seem to say that the Eurasian Economic Union will have to play along as well (which isn’t that shocking considering Russia, Armenia, and Kyrgyzstan are already in the WTO). Though it does make the EEU seem sort of… arbitrary…

In Russia, the Committee Against Torture is shutting its doors, forced into an untenable position by the state–unwilling to take the label as a ‘foreign agent’ and unable to bear the fines and pressure the group is closing. This is how Russia is silencing dissent. Meanwhile, Gazprom (Russia’s oil giant) is taking Turkmengaz to international arbitration in Sweden–over pricing of the gas Russia hasn’t bothered to pay for this year. This is how Russia is avoiding its debts. Then, in Tajikistan, Russian soldiers got into a drunken, half-naked brawl in the town near their base. Foreign troops abroad are not always great guests.

The US State Department upgraded Uzbekistan on the annual human trafficking report–which covers trafficking (in a stereotypical sense) and forced labor (“modern slavery”).

Across the region mudslides have destroyed hundreds of homes and resulted in at least a dozen deaths. While such things are common, especially in mountainous areas, the government’s response has reportedly been slow.

The Special Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) released its 28th quarterly report. If you’re into audits and inspections it’s pretty interesting, though depressing when the money starts adding up. There’s a special section on conditionality in aid worth reading.

That’s all for now. Onward to a new week and Issue 10 plots are already afoot.

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